Why You Pulled Your Hamstring and What You Need To Do To Prevent It

Hamstrings Complex

Biceps Femoris Long Head

Origin: Ischial tuberosity and sacrotuberous ligament

Insertion: Head of fibula

Action: Hip extension and knee flexion/external rotation

Innervation: Tibial nerve (L5-S2)

Biceps Femoris Short Head

Origin: Lateral lip of the linea aspera on the femur

Insertion: Head of the Fibula

Action: Knee flexion/ext

Innervation:  Common fibular nerve (L5-S2)

Semimembranosus

Origin:  Ischial Tuberosity

Insertion: Medial tibial condyle, oblique popliteal ligament, popliteus fascia

Action:  Hip extension and knee flexion/internal rotation

Innervation:  Tibial nerve (L5-S2)

Semitendinosus

Origin:  Ischial tuberosity and sacrotuberous ligament

Insertion: Medial to the tibial tuberosity in the pes anserinus

Action:  Hip extension and knee flexion and internal rotation

Innervation: Tibial nerve (L5-S2)

So?  If you have ever pulled your hamstring, you know that it sucks.  You can be sidelined for 2-8 weeks depending on the part of the hamstring you pulled.   You’re looking at 2-4 weeks if the pain is in the middle of your leg, and 6-8 weeks if the pain is higher up your leg, where it connects to the ischial tuberosity.  Hamstring strains usually occur when the hamstrings are trying to slow your femur down as it moves forward at a fast rate of speed, like in running, sprinting, or kicking.  Your hamstrings are primarily knee flexors, but three out of the four are also hip extensors.  When your glutes aren’t doing what they are supposed to be doing and slowing down hip flexion, your hamstrings are left to do more work than they can handle, and you end up being hamstrung.  Add “prevent hamstring strains” to the list of reasons why you should be working your glutes at the gym!  And also don’t forget to do this awesome eccentric hamstring exercise.