knee pain

Medial Knee Pain⚡️--Pes Anserine Bursitis--Part 3

 

Strengthening the muscles of the hip and knee 🏋️ is an important part of rehabilitation from pes anserine bursitis. As mentioned several posts ago, excessive foot pronation and knee valgus can contribute to inflammation of the bursa. These two exercises improve hip and knee strength and strengthen the muscles necessary to avoid excessive foot pronation and knee valgus (knees caving in) with activity. 1️⃣Gliders 🔸Place band around ankles 🔸Place towel (if on hardwood floor) or paper plate (if on carpet) under foot 🔸In a squat position, glide the leg out to the side, back/diagonal, and straight to the back 🔸Keep the standing leg in a squat the entire time and keep toes pointed forward 🔸You should feel both legs working 🔸Perform 2 sets of 10 on each leg 2️⃣Side steps with band around arches 🔸Place band around arches 🔸Pull arches up without rolling to the outsides of the feet 🔸Side step across floor 🔸Keep toes pointed forward, arches pulled up, knees slightly bent, and trunk still 🔸Do 2 laps 🔸If you want to really work the glutes, add another band around the knees or ankles

Hip Strength Series - Clams

 

Hip strengthening is the 🔑 to preventing injuries in the active population. Whether you're walking, going up and down stairs, squatting, running, or jumping, good glute strength will help to keep your joints protected. Strong glute muscles help to maintain proper trunk, knee, and foot alignment to prevent you from putting unnecessary stress on your joints. A strong 🍑 can help to prevent low back pain, patellofemoral pain, and IT band syndrome. Here are some of our favorite simple glute strengthening exercises to target the glute med, glute max, and hip external rotators

Leg Day - If Your House Has Stairs, I’m Staying In The Car

 

QUADRICEPS FEMORIS

Rectus Femoris

Origin: Anterior inferior iliac spine and the acetabular roof of the hip joint

Insertion:  Tibial tuberosity via the patellar ligament

Innervation: Femoral nerve (L2 - L4)

Action: Hip - flexion
            Knee - extionsion

Vastus Medialis

Origin: Linea aspera (medial lip), and the distal intertrochanteric line

Insertion: Tibial tuberosity via the patellar ligament

Innervation: Femoral nerve (L2 - L4)

Action: Knee extension

Vastus Lateralis

Origin: Linea aspera (lateral lip) and the lateral surface of the greater trochanter

Insertion: Tibial tuberosity via the patellar ligament

Innervation: Femoral nerve (L2 - L4)

Action: Knee extension

Vastus Intermedius

Origin: Anterior side of femoral shaft

Insertion: Tibial tuberosity via the patellar ligament

Innervation: Femoral nerve (L2 - L4)

Action: Knee extension

So?  These four muscles make up the quadriceps femoris.  They all attach to your patella (knee cap) via your quadriceps tendon, and continue down to your tibia via the patellar ligament (tendon?).  The patella gives the quadriceps muscles a major mechanical advantage by increasing their leverage, which basically allows the quads to do approximately 30% more work with the same effort.  However, all of those forces created when extending (straightening) your knee are directed into the patellofemoral joint surfaces - where the patella and femur (thigh bone) meet.  With overuse, this joint breaks down and/or can cause osteoarthritis.  To help slow the breakdown of cartilage in your knee, don’t forget to use your glutes when doing things like going up/down stairs and anytime you sit down, stand up or squat. The more your glutes help out, the less your quads have to work.  The less your quads work, the happier your knee joint will be.